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27

Jul

Moylan’s Moylander Double IPA 

Before leaving on our big trip, YM, RS and I decided we needed to take a trip up into the hills to try one of the best pizza places in Australia. Little Caesar’s has won numerous world titles for their pizzas, and I’ve been to their second store which is significantly closer to home and didn’t think too much of the pizza. I mean it was good, but not mind glowingly awesome.

Well, late on a Sunday night we made the 50 minute drive up into Mundairing and sat down along with the other locals. We knew it was BYO and so had planned to bring along some beer to try with the pizzas. I brought the Moylander Double IPA, which I have had since, and it just seems to get better every time.

At one of the International Beer Shop’s tastings, they ran through all the differences between IPA, DIPA and a few other styles, of which I remember that a DIPA was double the amount of everything, and in this case, it’s just perfect.

There’s heaps of pine bitterness, grass and a big hop explosion, that really pummels your taste buds with all that it’s got. It’s really enjoyable, and not over the top, which is I guess my big worry for big, bold DIPA’s.

The middle is smooth as silk, and the transition from the initial bitterness into the malt body flows as smooth as the Thames on a warms summers day. The ending flavour of the beer is bitter, and while some may find it a little harsh in the mouth, I think it tastes perfect. Whether the pizza toned down some of the bitterness, or after a few glasses of this I wasn’t feeling it any more I’m not sure, but all I can say is that this beer was made for Little Caesar’s Pizza. A match made in heaven.

Bought from the International Beer Shop for approx $13

JG

Moylan’s Moylander Double IPA

Before leaving on our big trip, YM, RS and I decided we needed to take a trip up into the hills to try one of the best pizza places in Australia. Little Caesar’s has won numerous world titles for their pizzas, and I’ve been to their second store which is significantly closer to home and didn’t think too much of the pizza. I mean it was good, but not mind glowingly awesome. Well, late on a Sunday night we made the 50 minute drive up into Mundairing and sat down along with the other locals. We knew it was BYO and so had planned to bring along some beer to try with the pizzas. I brought the Moylander Double IPA, which I have had since, and it just seems to get better every time. At one of the International Beer Shop’s tastings, they ran through all the differences between IPA, DIPA and a few other styles, of which I remember that a DIPA was double the amount of everything, and in this case, it’s just perfect. There’s heaps of pine bitterness, grass and a big hop explosion, that really pummels your taste buds with all that it’s got. It’s really enjoyable, and not over the top, which is I guess my big worry for big, bold DIPA’s. The middle is smooth as silk, and the transition from the initial bitterness into the malt body flows as smooth as the Thames on a warms summers day. The ending flavour of the beer is bitter, and while some may find it a little harsh in the mouth, I think it tastes perfect. Whether the pizza toned down some of the bitterness, or after a few glasses of this I wasn’t feeling it any more I’m not sure, but all I can say is that this beer was made for Little Caesar’s Pizza. A match made in heaven. Bought from the International Beer Shop for approx $13 JG

07

Jul

The Alchemist Heady Topper IPA

It was our last day in London and we were meeting a friend (AS) down at Abbey Road to get in a bit of Beatles history before leaving the big smoke and heading down to Brighton for a couple of days.

After cruising down to the studios and seeing all the other tourists trying to take the iconic album cover photo, we decided to have a relaxed afternoon, and I suggested we head down to The Craft Beer Co. which happened to be only a 10 minute walk from where we were staying in Kings Cross.

I can’t say that I’ve been to too many dedicated beer bars (5 and counting), but this is one fine establishment. Ratebeer ranks The Craft Beer Co. as the 4th best beer bar in the world, and I can certainly see why. Upon arriving, we were greeted with an absolutely monstrous selection of cask beers as well as at least 20 taps with guest beers that seemed to be lingering from their weekend celebrations. If I had known that the weekend gone was their one year anniversary we would have made sure to head there, but alas, we didn’t.

After having a friendly chat to the bartender, he mentioned that they had received a small shipment of the Alchemist Heady Topper, and were down to 7 cans. I couldn’t believe my luck; here was a beer that I’d salivated over for many months, watching all our American beer lovers post and repost about the all rounded awesomeness that the Heady Topper is.

When we were told the price of £13, YM and I decided to split the costs and taste what we hoped was going to be one hell of an awesome beer. I must say we were both pleasantly surprised about how well rounded and well crafted the beer was. It had huge orange and tropical fruit aromas, with hints of pineapple and a slight chalkiness.

The flavours that follow are no short of out of this world. While most other IPAs around this ABV are almost messy or too full flavoured, I found the Heady Topper to be perfectly balanced with a lovely lingering bitterness packed with more orange and other tropical fruits on the palate.

I would certainly get this one again, but would rather buy it in the US where it appears to be considerably cheaper.

Also on a side note: if you’re ever in London go to The Craft Beer Co., you won’t be disappointed.

JG

05

Jul

Einstöck (Icelandic) Toasted Porter

On the recommendations of Ohbeeryme, YM and I ended up at the borough market and whilst wandering around saw The Rake, another pub on our visit list. Whilst the selection is not as good as Euston Tap, for a local watering hole, The Rake certainly punches well above its weight in terms of beer selection.

This time around I had a little more difficult decision, because I was in the mood for a black IPA, but sadly the ones available I’d already tried. I then moved onto asking the bartender for a recommendation to which he put me onto Einstöck and their toasted porter which having seen a review of it just before leaving and not remembering whether or not it was favoured decided to give it a shot.

The beer poured a glorious brown black with a somewhat small off white head, that seemed to linger down the glass as I polished the beer off. I must admit I was slightly disappointed about the lack of roasted malts which was only further reinforced as I started to drink the beer.

I found that the beer lacked flavour in general and sadly didn’t live up to my expectations at all, both as a toasted porter and as a beer in general. The body felt watery, and the aftertaste was just not very pleasant. I was really quite disappointed with this one, and would like to know if any of you bloggers out there have managed to try any of the other Einstöck beers, because based on this one, I’m just not inclined to give the rest of their range a go, as the beer cost approx £4.50.

JG

Einstöck (Icelandic) Toasted Porter

On the recommendations of Ohbeeryme, YM and I ended up at the borough market and whilst wandering around saw The Rake, another pub on our visit list. Whilst the selection is not as good as Euston Tap, for a local watering hole, The Rake certainly punches well above its weight in terms of beer selection.

This time around I had a little more difficult decision, because I was in the mood for a black IPA, but sadly the ones available I’d already tried. I then moved onto asking the bartender for a recommendation to which he put me onto Einstöck and their toasted porter which having seen a review of it just before leaving and not remembering whether or not it was favoured decided to give it a shot.

The beer poured a glorious brown black with a somewhat small off white head, that seemed to linger down the glass as I polished the beer off. I must admit I was slightly disappointed about the lack of roasted malts which was only further reinforced as I started to drink the beer.

I found that the beer lacked flavour in general and sadly didn’t live up to my expectations at all, both as a toasted porter and as a beer in general. The body felt watery, and the aftertaste was just not very pleasant. I was really quite disappointed with this one, and would like to know if any of you bloggers out there have managed to try any of the other Einstöck beers, because based on this one, I’m just not inclined to give the rest of their range a go, as the beer cost approx £4.50.

JG

02

Jul

Kernel Brewery Galaxy IPA

So after a long day of sightseeing around London, YM and I realised that the Euston Tap was only a 10 minute walk away from where we were staying and happily agreed with our Melbourne friend AG that a trip there was a necessity before we left London and made our way down to Bath.

Upon entering, we were met with an amazing array of rotating craft beer tap and an even greater selection of bottled beers from around the world. I cannot stress how good the Euston Tap is and if you are in London and a lover of craft beer, this bar should be at the top of your list.

I must have looked overwhelmed to the bartender, because he offered me some help in choosing, and I needed up going with a Kernel Galaxy IPA, because I realised we sadly wouldn’t have time to make it to the brewery on Saturday, the only day they open their doors to the public.

Upon opening the beer, there were huge galaxy hop flavours, including freshly cut grass, pineapple and a touch of ……. The colour was a lovely golden orange/brown with a slight cloudy unfiltered appearance. I found the hop flavours of the  galaxy IPA to be very prominent and bold, giving the beer a very oily mouthfeel and finish, leading to a fantastic bitter aftertaste. I couldn’t get enough of the beer and was really sad to see the last drop from my glass go as I finished off the beer.

After seeing the local beer selections at most other pubs around London, the Euston Tap was a welcome relief amid a see of bland and stock-standard beers. This will definitely be the first of many Kernel beers I plan of tasting throughout my month in the UK, so keep a lookout for more to come.

Bought for approx £5 from the Euston Tap.

JG

Kernel Brewery Galaxy IPA

So after a long day of sightseeing around London, YM and I realised that the Euston Tap was only a 10 minute walk away from where we were staying and happily agreed with our Melbourne friend AG that a trip there was a necessity before we left London and made our way down to Bath.

Upon entering, we were met with an amazing array of rotating craft beer tap and an even greater selection of bottled beers from around the world. I cannot stress how good the Euston Tap is and if you are in London and a lover of craft beer, this bar should be at the top of your list.

I must have looked overwhelmed to the bartender, because he offered me some help in choosing, and I needed up going with a Kernel Galaxy IPA, because I realised we sadly wouldn’t have time to make it to the brewery on Saturday, the only day they open their doors to the public.

Upon opening the beer, there were huge galaxy hop flavours, including freshly cut grass, pineapple and a touch of ……. The colour was a lovely golden orange/brown with a slight cloudy unfiltered appearance. I found the hop flavours of the galaxy IPA to be very prominent and bold, giving the beer a very oily mouthfeel and finish, leading to a fantastic bitter aftertaste. I couldn’t get enough of the beer and was really sad to see the last drop from my glass go as I finished off the beer.

After seeing the local beer selections at most other pubs around London, the Euston Tap was a welcome relief amid a see of bland and stock-standard beers. This will definitely be the first of many Kernel beers I plan of tasting throughout my month in the UK, so keep a lookout for more to come.

Bought for approx £5 from the Euston Tap.

JG

13

Jun

Heretic Evil Cousin IPA
A few weeks ago, RS and I (finally) finished university, besides from a few remaining exams. The Friday of that same week in question also happened to be my last day at my engineering vacation job, and I had been debating with myself as to whether or not I deserved to treat myself to something special that night for dinner. Luckily, the beer geek in me won, and I pulled up at what is now one of a handful of Perth’s few specialty beer stores, which just so happened to be a 5 minute drive from work.
Whilst I am not a subscriber of Mane Liquor, I do know from my site visits that they carry a very extensive range of beers and claim to have over 1000. It’s really heartwarming to know that others feel so passionately about craft beer in such a small city, in a country known for being lager drinkers. I managed to pick up a Heretic, brewed by Jamil Zainasheff, who went from being an avid homebrewer and software engineer, to opening Heretic Brewing early last year.
Firstly, the labels are stunning. Heretic have done an outstanding job combining class and style into a label that gives off a feeling of being different, in a way that says ‘I’m awesome, I drink beer with flavour and character.’
The Imperial IPA pours a gorgeous hazy golden colour, and gives off huge piny, resinous hop flavours. The smell is thick and strong, but not in a bad way. You just know from the smell that you’re in for a massive hop kick.
This is a definite beer for hop heads. It is not packed with citrus or floral notes like some other Imperial IPAs, but it is rather an aggressive, hop forward IPA that packs the punches thick and fast, and asks for no forgiveness. I found the hop flavours to be bold, bitter and resinous, even a bit unbalanced at times, but ohh was it enjoyable. While it may be no Green Flash or Bear Republic, Jamil clearly knows how to brew. And for this dear sir, I applaud you.
Would I get it again: Hell yes!
Bought for $18 from Mane Liquor
JG

Heretic Evil Cousin IPA

A few weeks ago, RS and I (finally) finished university, besides from a few remaining exams. The Friday of that same week in question also happened to be my last day at my engineering vacation job, and I had been debating with myself as to whether or not I deserved to treat myself to something special that night for dinner. Luckily, the beer geek in me won, and I pulled up at what is now one of a handful of Perth’s few specialty beer stores, which just so happened to be a 5 minute drive from work.

Whilst I am not a subscriber of Mane Liquor, I do know from my site visits that they carry a very extensive range of beers and claim to have over 1000. It’s really heartwarming to know that others feel so passionately about craft beer in such a small city, in a country known for being lager drinkers. I managed to pick up a Heretic, brewed by Jamil Zainasheff, who went from being an avid homebrewer and software engineer, to opening Heretic Brewing early last year.

Firstly, the labels are stunning. Heretic have done an outstanding job combining class and style into a label that gives off a feeling of being different, in a way that says ‘I’m awesome, I drink beer with flavour and character.’

The Imperial IPA pours a gorgeous hazy golden colour, and gives off huge piny, resinous hop flavours. The smell is thick and strong, but not in a bad way. You just know from the smell that you’re in for a massive hop kick.

This is a definite beer for hop heads. It is not packed with citrus or floral notes like some other Imperial IPAs, but it is rather an aggressive, hop forward IPA that packs the punches thick and fast, and asks for no forgiveness. I found the hop flavours to be bold, bitter and resinous, even a bit unbalanced at times, but ohh was it enjoyable. While it may be no Green Flash or Bear Republic, Jamil clearly knows how to brew. And for this dear sir, I applaud you.

Would I get it again: Hell yes!

Bought for $18 from Mane Liquor

JG

08

Jun

Coopers Original Pale Ale
So far this week we really haven’t had much to write home about with Coopers. To be totally honest, I’m quite upset about this, as I wasn’t expecting such distaste for these massively popular Australian beers. But then again, we really haven’t been into following the masses, so maybe this week can be seen as a learning curve, where we have gone to the masses, tried their beers and subsequently decided that we’re beer geeks who just want to drink exciting and unique beers.
I’m not trying to say that we’re elitist, or too good for that widely available beer, because I really enjoy a Little Creatures Pale Ale or Feral Hog Hog IPA every now and then, and they are produced on a very large scale, albeit not as large as Coopers. Its just that our tastebuds need a solid hit of flavour, and sadly, some beers out there just aren’t able to satisfy our needs.
By now I’m sure you’re all sitting on the edge of your seats in suspense, waiting to see whether or not I’ll lash out and cut down the Coopers Pale Ale, just like the rest of the others we’ve tried this week. Or will the pale ale redeem the faults of the sparkling and mild ales?
Ok. Enough of that. The pale ale definitely smells like a pale ale should. There is the faint smell of hops, which gives way to a massive bitter smell. I thought I was in for a treat.
To taste, there is a very vague presence of hops, while some may argue that in fact they are almost non-existent, there’s definitely a hint of it. Then the bitterness of the beer takes hold, in an almost brutal way, and doesn’t let off the battering until your mouth has been subsequently ripped to shreds. Unfortunately, the bitter taste is not what you’d normally call enjoyable.
Its almost too brash, or unrefined, and because of this, I really can’t say I enjoyed it very much. I know the recipe for this has been around for ages, and that there are those who swear by it, but it feel as if the brewers decided that they would use whatever ingredients they had on hand, and didn’t care or give any love to how this would affect the final outcome.
I really don’t see the appeal to the Coopers Pale Ale, and would not see it fit to be able to compare it to the American Pale Ales on any level.
JG

Coopers Original Pale Ale

So far this week we really haven’t had much to write home about with Coopers. To be totally honest, I’m quite upset about this, as I wasn’t expecting such distaste for these massively popular Australian beers. But then again, we really haven’t been into following the masses, so maybe this week can be seen as a learning curve, where we have gone to the masses, tried their beers and subsequently decided that we’re beer geeks who just want to drink exciting and unique beers.

I’m not trying to say that we’re elitist, or too good for that widely available beer, because I really enjoy a Little Creatures Pale Ale or Feral Hog Hog IPA every now and then, and they are produced on a very large scale, albeit not as large as Coopers. Its just that our tastebuds need a solid hit of flavour, and sadly, some beers out there just aren’t able to satisfy our needs.

By now I’m sure you’re all sitting on the edge of your seats in suspense, waiting to see whether or not I’ll lash out and cut down the Coopers Pale Ale, just like the rest of the others we’ve tried this week. Or will the pale ale redeem the faults of the sparkling and mild ales?

Ok. Enough of that. The pale ale definitely smells like a pale ale should. There is the faint smell of hops, which gives way to a massive bitter smell. I thought I was in for a treat.

To taste, there is a very vague presence of hops, while some may argue that in fact they are almost non-existent, there’s definitely a hint of it. Then the bitterness of the beer takes hold, in an almost brutal way, and doesn’t let off the battering until your mouth has been subsequently ripped to shreds. Unfortunately, the bitter taste is not what you’d normally call enjoyable.

Its almost too brash, or unrefined, and because of this, I really can’t say I enjoyed it very much. I know the recipe for this has been around for ages, and that there are those who swear by it, but it feel as if the brewers decided that they would use whatever ingredients they had on hand, and didn’t care or give any love to how this would affect the final outcome.

I really don’t see the appeal to the Coopers Pale Ale, and would not see it fit to be able to compare it to the American Pale Ales on any level.

JG