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07

Sep

Brasserie des Rocs Triple Imperiale

We arrived in Brussels late on a Thursday afternoon, and after utilising the free wifi in the hotel lobby, picked out a few different bars to try for the night. The first place on our list was Delices and Caprices, a quaint little beer shop where you can sit down and also drink a few local beers. I’m not sure who manages this bar, but there was this awesome dude working there, and after having a quick discussion about our preferred tastes, brought us out a few different beers to sample.

While the selection here might not rival Beer Temple, the range is still fantastic, and I think what makes me want to go back is the service. It was a nice touch to be able to sit down with the bartender/owner, and discuss different styles, flavours and what other beers we should try whilst in Belgium.

The beer he brought me was the Brasserie des Rocs Triple Imperiale. It poured an golden-amber colour, with a thin white head. To smell there were sweet, fruity and spicy aromas emanating from the glass, and upon tasting, wow, there were just so many different complex layers that kept revealing themselves as the beer swilled around my palate. There is lots of sweet yeast and candied fruits, and the alcohol is masked superbly.

Just before we were about to leave I spied the last two 3 Fontinen beers sitting on the shelf, and after reading so much about this brewery and not being able to get my hands on this in Australia, decided to buy them. But more on these later.

So if you happen to see this awesome triple, snap it up. Bought for €3.20 from Delices and Caprices.

JG

Brasserie des Rocs Triple Imperiale

We arrived in Brussels late on a Thursday afternoon, and after utilising the free wifi in the hotel lobby, picked out a few different bars to try for the night. The first place on our list was Delices and Caprices, a quaint little beer shop where you can sit down and also drink a few local beers. I’m not sure who manages this bar, but there was this awesome dude working there, and after having a quick discussion about our preferred tastes, brought us out a few different beers to sample.

While the selection here might not rival Beer Temple, the range is still fantastic, and I think what makes me want to go back is the service. It was a nice touch to be able to sit down with the bartender/owner, and discuss different styles, flavours and what other beers we should try whilst in Belgium.

The beer he brought me was the Brasserie des Rocs Triple Imperiale. It poured an golden-amber colour, with a thin white head. To smell there were sweet, fruity and spicy aromas emanating from the glass, and upon tasting, wow, there were just so many different complex layers that kept revealing themselves as the beer swilled around my palate. There is lots of sweet yeast and candied fruits, and the alcohol is masked superbly.

Just before we were about to leave I spied the last two 3 Fontinen beers sitting on the shelf, and after reading so much about this brewery and not being able to get my hands on this in Australia, decided to buy them. But more on these later.

So if you happen to see this awesome triple, snap it up. Bought for €3.20 from Delices and Caprices.

JG

06

Sep

Cruzcampo Gran Reserva

From the same supermarket as the Sputnik vodka flavoured beer, we bring you the Cruzcampo Gran Reserva. We bought it because we wanted to see how different it was to the standard Cruzcampo, and to see if the Spanish could somehow redeem themselves from an appalling selection of mass produced beers.

Well, I can tell you that this is very malty, very sweet, and very lagery. It still tastes like crap though.

JG

Cruzcampo Gran Reserva

From the same supermarket as the Sputnik vodka flavoured beer, we bring you the Cruzcampo Gran Reserva. We bought it because we wanted to see how different it was to the standard Cruzcampo, and to see if the Spanish could somehow redeem themselves from an appalling selection of mass produced beers.

Well, I can tell you that this is very malty, very sweet, and very lagery. It still tastes like crap though.

JG

05

Sep

Sputnik Vodka Flavoured Beer

Whilst browsing the shelves at our local Mercadona (Spanish supermarket chain), we stumbled upon this and had to give it a try.

Firstly, what is vodka flavoured beer? How can beer taste like vodka? Well, it can’t. There was some citrus flavours in the beer, but that’s due to the citric flavouring they added in, probably as an afterthought.

My guess is whoever tasted this thought, mmm another boring beer, what can we do to make people buy it? I know, let’s claim that it vodka flavoured. And then give it a Russian space shuttle name. Excellent.

Well, don’t buy it, it’s not worth even a €1 price tag.

JG

Sputnik Vodka Flavoured Beer

Whilst browsing the shelves at our local Mercadona (Spanish supermarket chain), we stumbled upon this and had to give it a try.

Firstly, what is vodka flavoured beer? How can beer taste like vodka? Well, it can’t. There was some citrus flavours in the beer, but that’s due to the citric flavouring they added in, probably as an afterthought.

My guess is whoever tasted this thought, mmm another boring beer, what can we do to make people buy it? I know, let’s claim that it vodka flavoured. And then give it a Russian space shuttle name. Excellent.

Well, don’t buy it, it’s not worth even a €1 price tag.

JG

13

Aug

Moritz Brewery Barcelona

We were meant to take a train from Barcelona to San Sebastian last Friday, but when we got to the train station on Thursday afternoon to reserve out seat, we found out that both trains for Friday were fully booked. Needless to say we reserved the earliest train for saturday morning.

Thankfully, this slight deviation in plans turned out to be one of the best things that has happened to us so far. Firstly, it meant we got to stay an extra night in Barcelona, which is one of the coolest cities I’ve ever been too, and it meant we could chill out Thursday afternoon with the possibility of heading to a bar of some sorts.

My sister is currently studying architecture at university, and sent me through this link to the Moritz brewery, because the interior of the building was designed by the world famous architect, Jean Nouvel. I’d never heard of this guy before, and after flicking through a few photos, was amazed at this building and how beautiful it really was.

I think by the time we actually reached Barcelona I’d all but forgotten about this email, and only chanced upon it as I was clearing out a backlog of junk I’d received. After google maps told me it was only 15 minutes walk from the hostel, we both decided to grab a drink on this gorgeous day, and while away a few hours before heading out to dinner with a few of our new friends.

The building is spectacular. While the beers they serve are not that impressive, and are representative of the majority of Spanish beers available (the sweeter lager variety), I would highly recommend a trip there if you’re ever in Barcelona just to see the brewery itself.

While we were at the brewery we tried all three of the beers available, the Moritz, the Epidor and a half half mix of the two, which was probably our favourite of the three. It had the best balance of sweetness and malt, whereas the others by themselves had too much of one flavour and not enough of the other.

All in all it was a great afternoon, and as the total bill was less than €10 including a tapa, it was pretty reasonably priced too.

JG

11

Aug

Alhambra Reserva 1925

Just a quick post to say that I thoroughly enjoyed this beer with our lunch we made one afternoon in Barcelona. Whilst there’s not much to say about the beer other than the fact that it’s your typical Spanish beer, it does have quite a bit of mid palate sweetness that makes it a perfect food match, and the ABV is somewhere just above 6%.

You can buy a six pack for approx €5 from any good supermarket in Spain.

JG

Alhambra Reserva 1925

Just a quick post to say that I thoroughly enjoyed this beer with our lunch we made one afternoon in Barcelona. Whilst there’s not much to say about the beer other than the fact that it’s your typical Spanish beer, it does have quite a bit of mid palate sweetness that makes it a perfect food match, and the ABV is somewhere just above 6%.

You can buy a six pack for approx €5 from any good supermarket in Spain.

JG

09

Aug

Estrella Damm

In keeping with our theme of sampling local produce, YM and I headed out for a dinner of paella with a few our our new friends we met at our Barcelona hostel. At first we tried the hostels recommended local restaurant, but upon arriving realised that they only served it in an entrée size, and that seafood was their only choice, which none of us really wanted.

After walking through the bustling Barcelona streets for only a few minutes, we chanced upon this small local restaurant offering sliced jamon (ham) from the bone, paella, and pintxos (small tapas) that one eats with toothpicks.

The day had been really hot, and even though the sun was down, the humidity and heat remained. Needless to say, I was really thirsty, and the beer menu consisted of two of the most popular Spanish beers, namely San Miguel and Estrella. We’ve also noticed that the Spanish are really into their beer with lemon, as well as sangria and kalimotxo, a 50/50 combination of house wine and coke.

However, since we’d been in Spain for a few days, I thought it was only right to get an Estrella, and paired with paella, I was seriously satisfied. Sadly, the beer by itself is a total waste of time. It’s bland, tastes like a common lager and doesn’t really do much more for my palate than keep it hydrated.

I think it was the time and place, along with the food that actually made me enjoy this beer, but there is no way I would go out and buy a six pack of this stuff from the supermarket. A total waste of money in my mind.

You can buy a glass/bottle from just about any bar in Barcelona for €1

JG

Estrella Damm

In keeping with our theme of sampling local produce, YM and I headed out for a dinner of paella with a few our our new friends we met at our Barcelona hostel. At first we tried the hostels recommended local restaurant, but upon arriving realised that they only served it in an entrée size, and that seafood was their only choice, which none of us really wanted.

After walking through the bustling Barcelona streets for only a few minutes, we chanced upon this small local restaurant offering sliced jamon (ham) from the bone, paella, and pintxos (small tapas) that one eats with toothpicks.

The day had been really hot, and even though the sun was down, the humidity and heat remained. Needless to say, I was really thirsty, and the beer menu consisted of two of the most popular Spanish beers, namely San Miguel and Estrella. We’ve also noticed that the Spanish are really into their beer with lemon, as well as sangria and kalimotxo, a 50/50 combination of house wine and coke.

However, since we’d been in Spain for a few days, I thought it was only right to get an Estrella, and paired with paella, I was seriously satisfied. Sadly, the beer by itself is a total waste of time. It’s bland, tastes like a common lager and doesn’t really do much more for my palate than keep it hydrated.

I think it was the time and place, along with the food that actually made me enjoy this beer, but there is no way I would go out and buy a six pack of this stuff from the supermarket. A total waste of money in my mind.

You can buy a glass/bottle from just about any bar in Barcelona for €1

JG