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10

Aug

Tyris de Valencia

Whilst walking around the cobbled streets of San Sebastian a couple of days ago, I chanced upon this store, which appeared as a shining light amidst all of the darkness that is the majority of Spanish beer. What I chanced upon readers, was a Spanish craft beer shop, and whilst YM and I had already committed to sangria for the night, there was no way I was going to pass up the opportunity to try some Spanish craft beers.

We needed up buying a selection of 3 from various breweries, along with a Flying Dog that YM really wanted to try. I think over the course of our month in Spain/Portugal, we’ll end up trying all of them, as the sangria and wine here are just too good to pass up on.

After our first day of sun in San Sebastian, I decided it was time to open up the Tyris de Valencia, in order to quench my thirst from lazing about on the beach being in the sun all day (which proved to be very very tiring).

I was assured by the owner of the shop that this was similar to Hoegaarden, but it really wasn’t. It had slight hints of orange peel and yeast, but the Spanish have a long way to go if they think they can make a beer that tastes similar to Hoegaarden (which i feel is a stock standard wheat beer).

YM had a taste, and gave me the rest to finish. He described it as “too bland to even bother with” and I totally have to agree with him. The beer did nothing for me, other than make me slightly bloated afterwards. Whilst it may have been refreshing, there is nothing that makes you go wow, this is awesome, or wow, I need some more of that.

Whilst I don’t regret buying it, I am very much looking forward to the other Spanish beers we’ve bought, to see if they are any better. Fingers crossed they are.

Bought for €2.15 from La Boutique de la Cerveza

JG

Tyris de Valencia

Whilst walking around the cobbled streets of San Sebastian a couple of days ago, I chanced upon this store, which appeared as a shining light amidst all of the darkness that is the majority of Spanish beer. What I chanced upon readers, was a Spanish craft beer shop, and whilst YM and I had already committed to sangria for the night, there was no way I was going to pass up the opportunity to try some Spanish craft beers.

We needed up buying a selection of 3 from various breweries, along with a Flying Dog that YM really wanted to try. I think over the course of our month in Spain/Portugal, we’ll end up trying all of them, as the sangria and wine here are just too good to pass up on.

After our first day of sun in San Sebastian, I decided it was time to open up the Tyris de Valencia, in order to quench my thirst from lazing about on the beach being in the sun all day (which proved to be very very tiring).

I was assured by the owner of the shop that this was similar to Hoegaarden, but it really wasn’t. It had slight hints of orange peel and yeast, but the Spanish have a long way to go if they think they can make a beer that tastes similar to Hoegaarden (which i feel is a stock standard wheat beer).

YM had a taste, and gave me the rest to finish. He described it as “too bland to even bother with” and I totally have to agree with him. The beer did nothing for me, other than make me slightly bloated afterwards. Whilst it may have been refreshing, there is nothing that makes you go wow, this is awesome, or wow, I need some more of that.

Whilst I don’t regret buying it, I am very much looking forward to the other Spanish beers we’ve bought, to see if they are any better. Fingers crossed they are.

Bought for €2.15 from La Boutique de la Cerveza

JG

07

Aug

La Cagole de Marseille Blonde
The South of France is expensive. YM and I were there just over a week ago, and the cost of going out for a meal is just insane. Whilst we did some eating out, the majority of our meals were created with awesome local produce, either from the markets or a supermarket. Needless to say, our budgeting was going fantastically, until we saw the price of beer. Weve been in Spain now for just over a week, and you can buy a 6 pack for less than €3, so why was France so much worse?
Whatever the reason, we pretty much only drank red wine, which happened to have a price range of €1.50 to €4. The wine was really good, and seemed to complement our 15 minute meals perfectly.
It was also really hard to find local beer, and due to this, we stayed as far away from beer as possible. There was just no point drinking a rubbish beer that cost 3 to 4 times as much a a whole bottle of wine.
However, last Sunday was spent wandering around Marseille, and because no shops were open (no sunday trading France, seriously!) we happened upon this cozy little shop in the Vieux Port area that was selling local produce. We decided to go in and check out their range, since we were just wandering and were slightly bored. Needless to say the range inside included an amazing selection of spreads, picked vegetables, liqueurs and beer.
Feeling in the mood for a beer rather than wine, i decided to buy a bottle, just because it was local and hadn’t seen it anywhere else. As you can probably gather from the image above, the beer looks like a typical blonde or lager. It had a similar smell to a Belgian blonde, albeit slightly less fruity or yeasty.
To taste, I must admit it was quite bland, and didn’t contain much flavour other than your typical blonde lager notes, including malt and hay. While the finish may be dry and bitter, you could go and lick some cardboard the replicate the same taste that drinking this beer has and save yourself the cash.
It is both bland and boring at the same time, but somehow, that’s what the French seem to like.
Bought for €5 from Marseille
JG

La Cagole de Marseille Blonde

The South of France is expensive. YM and I were there just over a week ago, and the cost of going out for a meal is just insane. Whilst we did some eating out, the majority of our meals were created with awesome local produce, either from the markets or a supermarket. Needless to say, our budgeting was going fantastically, until we saw the price of beer. Weve been in Spain now for just over a week, and you can buy a 6 pack for less than 3, so why was France so much worse?

Whatever the reason, we pretty much only drank red wine, which happened to have a price range of 1.50 to 4. The wine was really good, and seemed to complement our 15 minute meals perfectly.

It was also really hard to find local beer, and due to this, we stayed as far away from beer as possible. There was just no point drinking a rubbish beer that cost 3 to 4 times as much a a whole bottle of wine.

However, last Sunday was spent wandering around Marseille, and because no shops were open (no sunday trading France, seriously!) we happened upon this cozy little shop in the Vieux Port area that was selling local produce. We decided to go in and check out their range, since we were just wandering and were slightly bored. Needless to say the range inside included an amazing selection of spreads, picked vegetables, liqueurs and beer.

Feeling in the mood for a beer rather than wine, i decided to buy a bottle, just because it was local and hadn’t seen it anywhere else. As you can probably gather from the image above, the beer looks like a typical blonde or lager. It had a similar smell to a Belgian blonde, albeit slightly less fruity or yeasty.

To taste, I must admit it was quite bland, and didn’t contain much flavour other than your typical blonde lager notes, including malt and hay. While the finish may be dry and bitter, you could go and lick some cardboard the replicate the same taste that drinking this beer has and save yourself the cash.

It is both bland and boring at the same time, but somehow, that’s what the French seem to like.

Bought for 5 from Marseille

JG

30

Jul

Hoegaarden Rosée

This was a total impulse buy from a local supermarket in Nice. The day was warm, we had been drinking red wine for a few nights because the price of the beer is really expensive and wine is so much cheaper.

Having this fruit beer was quite fun, and even though it tasted like sweet cider or a lolly drink, it was perfect for the weather.

In all honesty, the beer taste like raspberries, and is otherwise quite bland. Worth a try, but I wouldn’t go back and get any more.

I think we paid €1.20 for a really small bottle (possibly 250mL)

JG

Hoegaarden Rosée

This was a total impulse buy from a local supermarket in Nice. The day was warm, we had been drinking red wine for a few nights because the price of the beer is really expensive and wine is so much cheaper.

Having this fruit beer was quite fun, and even though it tasted like sweet cider or a lolly drink, it was perfect for the weather.

In all honesty, the beer taste like raspberries, and is otherwise quite bland. Worth a try, but I wouldn’t go back and get any more.

I think we paid €1.20 for a really small bottle (possibly 250mL)

JG

03

Jul

St Feuillien Farmhouse Ale

This one was more of a spur of the moment sort of beer when we went round the corner of our hostel to get some free wifi to The Queen’s Head, which for a local pub had a pretty decent beer selection, including Goose Island, Brooklyn and a few other local craft beers which I hadn’t heard of before.

Some of the US bottled beers were a little expensive for my liking, and since YM owed me a drink, I went for a Belgian wheat/farmhouse ale, which was really cheap at only 3.50. The smell of the beer was your typical Belgian wit, with a lingering sweetness and yeastiness that lead onto a little bit of spiciness.

I found the beer to be lacking in the body, but which was redeemed by the obvious banana, coriander and orange peel flavours. It was a tad spicy, and I didn’t feel compelled to keep coming back for more. Rather the beer was a nice distraction from the mountain of emails I’ve been receiving from home.

I wouldn’t rush back to this one, and I the only reason I’d go back to this one would be for a session able beer on a warm summers day to quench a thirst.

JG

St Feuillien Farmhouse Ale

This one was more of a spur of the moment sort of beer when we went round the corner of our hostel to get some free wifi to The Queen’s Head, which for a local pub had a pretty decent beer selection, including Goose Island, Brooklyn and a few other local craft beers which I hadn’t heard of before.

Some of the US bottled beers were a little expensive for my liking, and since YM owed me a drink, I went for a Belgian wheat/farmhouse ale, which was really cheap at only 3.50. The smell of the beer was your typical Belgian wit, with a lingering sweetness and yeastiness that lead onto a little bit of spiciness.

I found the beer to be lacking in the body, but which was redeemed by the obvious banana, coriander and orange peel flavours. It was a tad spicy, and I didn’t feel compelled to keep coming back for more. Rather the beer was a nice distraction from the mountain of emails I’ve been receiving from home.

I wouldn’t rush back to this one, and I the only reason I’d go back to this one would be for a session able beer on a warm summers day to quench a thirst.

JG

14

Jun

MoonDog MacGuava (Magnificent Mullet Series)
Hefeweisse beers are essentially what got me interested in craft beer in the first place. At first, it was Hoegaarden, then I moved onto Blanche De Namur, which I believe to be the pinnacle of wheat beers. It is both fruity, wheaty and has powerful aromas of coriander, orange peel and spices.
Now MoonDog is probably one of the most inventive Australian Breweries at the moment. They seem to have caught the crazy brewing bug from Mikkeller, and seem to be smashing out interesting brews all the time, to a much smaller extent. This has not deterred us Tre Amigos from buying their crazy concoctions and giving them a shot. This is one of a trilogy of beers from their Magnificent Mullet Series, which focuses on mashing two totally different flavours and seeing the results that occur.
The MacGuava certainly smelt and looked like a typical Hefeweizen. It poured a cloudy peachy-white colour, and gave off gorgeous aromas of lemon zest, orange rind, and a pinch of coriander. YM and I tasted the beer at the same time, and both however noted an absence of guava related aromas, which we though was very strange considering the beer was primarily based around these flavours.
It was disappointing upon tasting that the beer had almost no guava taste, and if it did, it was certainly masked by the other fruity flavours infused into the brew. This was a real let down for me because the Black Lung which YM had reviewed a while ago was perfectly balanced and tasted absolutely delicious.
While I won’t recommend you go and buy this, I will definitely keep buying MoonDog in the future, because I’m really excited about everything they do. I have no doubt that they will learn from their mistakes and come up with who knows what in the future. All I can say is, watch this space for more exciting things to come from these boys!
About $6 from the International Beer Shop
JG

MoonDog MacGuava (Magnificent Mullet Series)

Hefeweisse beers are essentially what got me interested in craft beer in the first place. At first, it was Hoegaarden, then I moved onto Blanche De Namur, which I believe to be the pinnacle of wheat beers. It is both fruity, wheaty and has powerful aromas of coriander, orange peel and spices.

Now MoonDog is probably one of the most inventive Australian Breweries at the moment. They seem to have caught the crazy brewing bug from Mikkeller, and seem to be smashing out interesting brews all the time, to a much smaller extent. This has not deterred us Tre Amigos from buying their crazy concoctions and giving them a shot. This is one of a trilogy of beers from their Magnificent Mullet Series, which focuses on mashing two totally different flavours and seeing the results that occur.

The MacGuava certainly smelt and looked like a typical Hefeweizen. It poured a cloudy peachy-white colour, and gave off gorgeous aromas of lemon zest, orange rind, and a pinch of coriander. YM and I tasted the beer at the same time, and both however noted an absence of guava related aromas, which we though was very strange considering the beer was primarily based around these flavours.

It was disappointing upon tasting that the beer had almost no guava taste, and if it did, it was certainly masked by the other fruity flavours infused into the brew. This was a real let down for me because the Black Lung which YM had reviewed a while ago was perfectly balanced and tasted absolutely delicious.

While I won’t recommend you go and buy this, I will definitely keep buying MoonDog in the future, because I’m really excited about everything they do. I have no doubt that they will learn from their mistakes and come up with who knows what in the future. All I can say is, watch this space for more exciting things to come from these boys!

About $6 from the International Beer Shop

JG

03

Apr

Mad Brewers Hoppy Hefe
Free stuff is always nice, and what could be better than free beer. This beer was given to me by my boss at work, who specifically requested that I taste the beer in order to recommend to customers. I was really excited as I took this brand new limited release from Mad Brewers home, because as of late, us Tre Amigos have been really trying and liking some crazily hopped IPA’s. I am also a big fan of the Blanche de Namur, so what could be better than what I hoped was going to be one epic combination beer.
First, a bit of background on the Mad Brewers for all the non-Aussies. Mad brewers falls under the Hahn Brewing company, which make mass produced junk for the Australian beer market. The other brand that falls under the Hahn banner is James Squire, which has a semi craft beer appearance, and doesn’t taste too bad. Mad Brewers is the Hahn Brewing Company’s super craft label, which produces limited edition brews that are released bi-annually (generally). This is the first time my work has stocked Mad Brewers, so given the opportunity to taste and rate this beer I jumped at the chance.
Well to say I was disappointed when I opened the bottle was an understatement. This beer does not look or taste anything like a hefe, but rather a cloudy pale ale or weak IPA. The hoppy hefe pours a dark golden amber colour, with a beautiful pillowy head that seems to last forever. There are definite fruity notes on the nose, with pineapple and orange being most dominant. The wheatiness of the beer lacked any sort of recognition, and I feel that the hop flavours dominated any such chance of the typical yeasty or earthy tones that could have otherwise been present.
On tasting, there appears to be absolutely no sign of a hefe body, and for the most, this so called “Hoppy Hefe” tastes like an APA with moderate fruity hop bitterness, which gradually increases as the beer warms to room temperature. Whilst this beer may be labelled “refreshing”, it has absolutely no notes that are present in the best hefe’s. Maybe the Mad Brewers have been drinking Pure Blonde White or Hahn White (which is more likely).
There is no way I would have this again, as I feel it is a disgrace to be drinking a beer that calls itself a “Hoppy Hefe”, and yet it has nothing on any decent wheat beer. I do feel a little let down, but if they’d correctly called it an APA, it wouldn’t be so bad.
Can be bought from BWS for $9 (but its not worth it)
JG

Mad Brewers Hoppy Hefe

Free stuff is always nice, and what could be better than free beer. This beer was given to me by my boss at work, who specifically requested that I taste the beer in order to recommend to customers. I was really excited as I took this brand new limited release from Mad Brewers home, because as of late, us Tre Amigos have been really trying and liking some crazily hopped IPA’s. I am also a big fan of the Blanche de Namur, so what could be better than what I hoped was going to be one epic combination beer.

First, a bit of background on the Mad Brewers for all the non-Aussies. Mad brewers falls under the Hahn Brewing company, which make mass produced junk for the Australian beer market. The other brand that falls under the Hahn banner is James Squire, which has a semi craft beer appearance, and doesn’t taste too bad. Mad Brewers is the Hahn Brewing Company’s super craft label, which produces limited edition brews that are released bi-annually (generally). This is the first time my work has stocked Mad Brewers, so given the opportunity to taste and rate this beer I jumped at the chance.

Well to say I was disappointed when I opened the bottle was an understatement. This beer does not look or taste anything like a hefe, but rather a cloudy pale ale or weak IPA. The hoppy hefe pours a dark golden amber colour, with a beautiful pillowy head that seems to last forever. There are definite fruity notes on the nose, with pineapple and orange being most dominant. The wheatiness of the beer lacked any sort of recognition, and I feel that the hop flavours dominated any such chance of the typical yeasty or earthy tones that could have otherwise been present.

On tasting, there appears to be absolutely no sign of a hefe body, and for the most, this so called “Hoppy Hefe” tastes like an APA with moderate fruity hop bitterness, which gradually increases as the beer warms to room temperature. Whilst this beer may be labelled “refreshing”, it has absolutely no notes that are present in the best hefe’s. Maybe the Mad Brewers have been drinking Pure Blonde White or Hahn White (which is more likely).

There is no way I would have this again, as I feel it is a disgrace to be drinking a beer that calls itself a “Hoppy Hefe”, and yet it has nothing on any decent wheat beer. I do feel a little let down, but if they’d correctly called it an APA, it wouldn’t be so bad.

Can be bought from BWS for $9 (but its not worth it)

JG